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Reader center: What does Zuma’s resignation teach Nigeria? – Readers comment

Earlier today, Bloomgist published the news f the resignation of former South Africa president, Jacob Zuma, who resigned just on the eve of a no-confidence vote sponsored by his own party, ANC.

Bloomgist readers have taken to both our web comment section and on Bloomgist social media handles to express their views on the news and their expectations from other African countries like Nigeria.

Below is one of the comments we picked out of them.

Can any minster in Nigeria ever resign because of allegations of corruption, talk less of a governor or a president?

Even Dino Melaye (Ajekun iya Senator) who his constituency made several collective efforts to recall has not been pulled out, his recall is still a test of democracy in a jury-less Nigeria.

Well, folks, there you have it; the power of a jury system, and the level of probity and accountability and reverence that politicians have for the voice and will of their citizenry. For all those who would be quick to ascribe this cheap feat in a country like South Africa to anything order than the ripple effects and benefits of the jury system; I’d say, simplify their national conscience all you want, but in the absence of the fear and regard for the citizenry by politicians, this kind of effect would hardly be felt in Nigeria even if we revert to ‘truest’ federalism!

The power of a jury-empowered citizenry…oh, how badly we pray for this to also be witnessed in Nigeria: well, I guess it is time Nigerians look introspectively and ready ourselves to be legally and constitutionally given a role in governance and a resounding voice in the room, else we would remain in a state of trance.

With Nigerians as jurors, politicians would fear, respect and regard us, because our civic duties would go beyond election voting every four years. Never under-estimate the power of a jury system!

Written by a Bloomgist Reader

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