Weekend recipe: Hot brown

Hot brown – Bloomgist Food recipe
  • YIELD4 servings
  • TIME25 minutes

The Hot Brown was invented in 1926 at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, Ky., by the chef Fred Schmidt. The open-faced turkey sandwich, smothered in Mornay sauce and topped with bacon, was served to customers at late-night  dances, while the band was on its break. The dish has become a Louisville staple, one well suited for Derby Day or after Thanksgiving, when roast turkey is plentiful. Thick slices of bread do not get lost under the meat and sauce. Hand-carved turkey is best for the dish; deli turkey slices do not deliver the same Hot Brown experience.

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE SANDWICH:

  • 1 (8-inch) sandwich loaf (about 20 ounces), cut evenly into 8 slices, crust removed
  • 2 tomatoes, quartered
  • 1 pound roasted turkey breast, thickly sliced

FOR THE MORNAY SAUCE:

  • ¼ cup unsalted butter (1/2 stick)
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • ½ cup shredded Pecorino Romano (about 1 1/2 ounces)
  •  Pinch of ground nutmeg
  •  Salt and freshly ground pepper

FOR ASSEMBLING:

  •  Shredded Pecorino Romano, for sprinkling
  • 8 slices crisp cooked bacon
  •  Chopped parsley, for garnish
  •  Paprika, for garnish

PREPARATION

  1. Prepare the sandwich: Heat oven to 400 degrees. Cut 4 bread slices in half diagonally. Divide the remaining 4 whole slices among four individual 7-by-9-inch (or other similarly sized) baking dishes (see Tip), and place 2 pieces of halved bread on opposite sides of the bread, positioning the longest side of each triangle closest to the whole slice of bread. The formation will look like a two-way arrow. Nestle a piece of tomato on either side of the whole slices of bread, forming a square shape with the bread triangles. Divide the turkey slices among the whole slices of bread. Transfer the casseroles to the oven to toast as you prepare the sauce.
  2. Prepare the Mornay sauce: Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in flour until mixture forms a roux. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking frequently, 2 minutes. Whisk heavy cream and milk into the roux and cook over medium until the sauce begins to simmer and thicken, 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. Remove the sauce from the heat and whisk in 1/2 cup Pecorino Romano until the sauce is smooth. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Remove the dishes from the oven and pour the Mornay sauce over each, smothering the meat, bread and tomatoes.
  5. Sprinkle additional Pecorino Romano on top of each dish and broil until the cheese begins to brown and bubble, 4 to 5 minutes, working in batches, if necessary.
  6. Remove from the broiler and cross 2 slices of bacon over each dish. Sprinkle with parsley and paprika, and serve immediately.

Tip

  • You can also assemble this in a 9-by-13-inch casserole dish. Do not slice the bread into triangles, and instead overlap bread to fit casserole, dividing turkey among each bread slice, and nestling tomato quarters evenly along the longer sides of the dish. Prepare and broil as described. Top each broiled square with a slice of bacon broken in half and crossed. Garnish.
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Weekend recipe: pot roast

At Spoon and Stable, his Minneapolis restaurant, Gavin Kaysen cooks a version of his grandmother Dorothy’s pot roast using paleron (or flat iron roast), the shoulder cut of beef commonly used in pot au feu, as well as housemade sugo finto, a vegetarian version of meat sauce made with puréed tomatoes and minced carrot, celery, onions and herbs. This recipe uses a chuck roast and tomato paste, both easier to find and still delicious.

pot-roast-articlelarge

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 pound boneless beef chuck roast
  •  Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 medium red onions, cut into quarters
  • 4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 stalks celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 rutabaga, peeled and cut into 12 to 16 pieces, about a pound
  • 8 cremini mushrooms, halved
  • 2 parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 head garlic, top cut off to expose cloves
  • ¾ cup tomato paste
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 sprigs rosemary
  • 1 ½ cups red wine, preferably cabernet
  • 4 cups beef broth

PREPARATION

  1. Preheat oven to 340 degrees. Season meat generously with salt and pepper. On the stove top, heat oil in a large Dutch oven, or other heavy roasting pan with a lid, over medium-high heat. Sear the meat until a dark crust forms, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Remove meat to a plate.
  2. Reduce heat to medium and add butter to the pan. Melt the butter and add the whole head of garlic and vegetables, stirring frequently and scraping the bottom of the pot, until the vegetables start to color, 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring frequently, until it darkens slightly, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add bay leaves, rosemary and wine and cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced to a thick gravy consistency, 5 to 7 minutes.
  5. Return meat to the pot. Add broth, then cover the pot and transfer to the oven. Cook for 2 hours 20 minutes.
  6. Let roast sit at room temperature for at least 10 minutes. Remove meat to a cutting board to slice. Discard bay leaves and rosemary stems. Squeeze any garlic cloves remaining in their skins into the stew and discard the skins. Serve slices of meat in shallow bowls along with the vegetables and a generous amount of cooking liquid ladled over top.

 

Today’s recipe: North African bean stew with barley and winter squash

Today’s recipe: North African bean stew with barley and winter squash

Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

This warming, highly spiced stew is rich in beans, grains and chunks of sweet winter squash. Feel free to substitute other grains for the barley. Farro works particularly well. If you’d prefer something soupier, thin it with a little broth or water before serving.

  • YIELD8 to 10 servings
  • TIME1 hour 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS

  •  cup extra-virgin olive oil, more for serving
  • 2 leeks, white and green parts, diced
  • 1 bunch cilantro, leaves and stems separated
  • 1 cup finely diced fennel, fronds reserved (1/2 large fennel bulb)
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 ½ tablespoons baharat (see note)
  • ½ cinnamon stick
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 quarts chicken or vegetable broth
  • ½ cup pearled barley
  • 2 ½ teaspoons kosher salt, more as needed
  •  Large pinch saffron, crumbled (optional)
  • 4 cups cooked beans or chickpeas
  • 2 cups peeled and diced butternut squash (1 small squash)
  • ¾ cup peeled and diced turnip (1 medium)
  • ½ cup red lentils
  •  Plain yogurt, for serving
  •  Aleppo pepper or hot paprika, for serving

PREPARATION

  1. In a large pot over medium heat, heat oil and cook leeks until they begin to brown, 10 to 12 minutes.
  2. Finely chop cilantro stems. Stir into pot, along with diced fennel and garlic. Cook for 2 minutes. Stir in baharat, cinnamon and tomato paste, and cook until paste begins to caramelize, about 2 minutes.
  3. Stir in broth, 3 cups water, the barley and the salt. Bring to a gentle boil, stir in saffron, if using, and reduce heat to medium. Simmer uncovered for 40 minutes. Stir in beans, squash, turnip and lentils; cook until barley is tender, about another 20 to 30 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings, if desired. Remove cinnamon stick.
  4. Ladle stew into bowls. Spoon a dollop of yogurt on top and drizzle with olive oil. Garnish with cilantro leaves, fennel fronds and Aleppo pepper or paprika.

Tip

  • Baharat is a Middle Eastern spice mix. You can buy it at specialty markets or make your own. To make it, combine 2 tablespoons sweet paprika, 1 tablespoon ground coriander, 1 tablespoon ground cumin, 1 tablespoon ground turmeric, 2 teaspoons black pepper, 1 teaspoon grated nutmeg, 1 teaspoon ground cardamom and 1 teaspoon allspice.

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Today’s recipe: Braised lamb with red wine and prunes

braised-lamb-with-red-wine-articlelarge

Sam Kaplan for The New York Times. Food stylist: Susan Ottoviano.

Though far less glorified than rib chops or legs, lamb shoulder is explosively delicious and juicy – also, cheap. Like the shoulders of pigs and cows, it is a hardworking muscle rippled with intramuscular fat, which makes it ideal for stewing or braising.

But the shoulder’s not that hardworking, which keeps it tender enough to be subjected to the shorter blasts of heat typically reserved for more elegant cuts. Here, it’s braised in a flavorful mixture of prunes, red wine and spices until tender.

  • YIELD4 to 6 servings
  • TIME2 hours 30 minutes

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 pounds lamb shoulder
  • 1 cup pitted prunes
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  •  Salt and pepper
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 2 teaspoons minced ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 ½ cup red wine
  • ½ cup stock or water

PREPARATION

  1. Cut lamb into 2-inch cubes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and brown in a large skillet over medium-high heat; remove.
  2. Add onion, garlic, prunes, ginger, cinnamon, salt and pepper; cook until fragrant. Add wine, stock or water and browned lamb. When the liquid boils, lower heat to a simmer, cover and cook until tender, 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours. Garnish: Parsley.

Today’s recipe: Buttermilk panna cotta with apricots

Today’s recipe: Buttermilk panna cotta with apricots

Ruby Tandoh’s buttermilk panna cotta with apricots. Photo: Louise Hagger for the Guardian


There’s not much that can’t be salvaged with butter. Here, it’s tinned apricots: thrown into a hot pan until they begin to char, then glazed with molten butter and maple syrup. Served with a tangy, silken buttermilk panna cotta, these precious little orbs are enough single-handedly to salvage the reputation of untrendy tinned fruit. You can replace the apricots with pears or even pineapple, if that’s what you’ve got lurking at the back of the cupboard. Just treat them with respect. And butter.

Serves 4

  • 2-4 gelatine leaves or vegetarian gelatine (gelatine varies in strength, so use enough to set a half-pint of liquid (285ml), according to the packet; you want a soft set for this panna cotta)
  • 150ml double cream
  • 300ml buttermilk
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 x 400g tin apricot halves in light syrup
  • 25g butter
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp toasted flaked almonds, to serve (optional)

Cut the gelatine into pieces and put in a bowl of cold water. Leave for five minutes, during which time they’ll transform from brittle shards to soft, slippery slivers.

Drain the gelatine, squeeze out any excess water, then put in a small pan with the cream. Set over a low heat, and stir continuously until the very first bubbles just start rising to the surface. Immediately turn off the heat, add the buttermilk, sugar and lemon juice, and whisk until smooth. Taste for sweetness and acidity, adding a little extra sugar or lemon accordingly.

Divide the mixture between four lightly greased ramekins or individual pudding basins, then put in the fridge to cool and set for two to three hours.

Just before you’re ready to serve, drain the apricots and pat dry with kitchen towel. Heat a nonstick frying pan or griddle on a medium-high flame and, once hot, lay in the apricot halves cut side down (if using a griddle, brush the fruit with a little oil first). Leave to colour and char for a minute or so, then flip over and cook for a minute more. Add the butter and maple syrup, then swirl around the pan to coat the apricot in the rich syrup.

To unmould the panna cottas, dip the ramekins in hot water for 20-30 seconds, then carefully flip out on to a plate. Serve the cool, quivering cream with the hot apricots, scattering over a few toasted flaked almonds for crunch, if you wish.


Food stylist: Emily Kydd. Prop stylist: Jennifer Kay.

Today’s recipe: Moroccan chickpeas with chard

An array of aromatic spices, along with chopped dried apricots and preserved lemons give this chickpea stew a complex, deep flavor, while chard stems and leaves lighten and freshen it up.

clark-chickpea-stew-superjumbo

Served with couscous or flatbread, it’s a satisfying meatless meal on its own. Or serve it with roasted chicken, beef or lamb as a hearty side dish. If you can find rainbow chard, you’ll get the best color here, but any chard variety (red, Swiss, yellow) will work well.


  • YIELD6 to 8 servings
  • TIME2 1/2 hours, plus overnight soaking

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 Spanish onions, chopped
  • 1 large jalapeño pepper, seeded if desired, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
  • 2 ½ teaspoons kosher salt, more to taste
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  •  Pinch of cayenne
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 fennel bulb, diced (save fronds for garnish)
  • 1 very large bunch chard, stems sliced 1/2-inch thick, leaves torn into bite-size pieces
  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 large turnip, peeled and diced
  • 1 pound dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in water to cover or quick-soaked (see note)
  •  cup diced dried apricots
  • 2 tablespoons chopped preserved lemon, more to taste
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro, more for garnish

PREPARATION

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over high heat. Add onion and jalapeño and sauté until limp, 3 minutes. Add garlic, ginger, salt, turmeric, paprika, cinnamon, cumin, black pepper and cayenne and sauté until they release their fragrance, about 2 minutes. Add tomato paste and sauté for another minute, until darkened but not burned. (If tomato paste looks too dark too quickly, lower heat.)
  2. Add fennel, chard stems, carrot and turnip and continue to sauté until vegetables start to soften, about 10 minutes. Add chickpeas and water to barely cover.
  3. Return heat to high if you lowered it and bring to a simmer. Partly cover pot, lower heat to medium low, and simmer for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until chickpeas are softened. Add more water if needed (this should be like a stew).
  4. Add chard leaves, apricots and preserved lemon to pot and continue simmering until chard is tender, about 5 minutes longer. Season with more salt if desired, and serve garnished with cilantro and reserved fennel fronds.

    Tip

    • To quick-soak chickpeas, bring them to a boil in water to cover by 1 inch. Turn off the heat and let soak for 1 hour. Drain.

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Today’s recipe: Lasagna

In 2001, Regina Schrambling went on a week long odyssey in search of the ultimate lasagna recipe. She tested several, and finally found her ideal in a mash-up of recipes from Giuliano Bugialli and Elodia Rigante, both Italian cookbook authors.

“If there were central casting for casseroles, this one deserved the leading role. But its beauty was more than cheese deep. This was the best lasagna I had ever eaten. The sauce was intensely flavored, the cheeses melted into creaminess as if they were bechamel, the meat was just chunky enough, and the noodles put up no resistance to the fork. Most important, the balance of pasta and sauce was positively Italian. At last I could understand why my neighbor Geoff had told me, as I dragged home more bags in our elevator, that all-day lasagna is the only kind worth making.”


  • YIELD: 8 to 10 servings
  • TIME: 4 hours

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE SAUCE:

  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium red onions, finely diced
  • 2 large cloves minced garlic
  • 8 ounces pancetta, diced
  •  Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 ½ cups good red wine, preferably Italian
  • 2 28-ounce cans Italian plum tomatoes
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ¾ pound ground sirloin
  • ¼ cup freshly grated pecorino Romano
  • 2 eggs
  • 10 sprigs fresh parsley, leaves only, washed and dried
  • 2 large whole cloves garlic
  • ½ cup flour
  • 1 pound Italian sausage, a mix of hot and sweet

FOR THE LASAGNA:

  • 1 15-ounce container ricotta cheese
  • 2 extra-large eggs
  • 2 cups freshly grated pecorino Romano
  • ½ cup chopped parsley
  • 1 pound mozzarella, grated
  • 16 sheets fresh lasagna noodles, preferably Antica Pasteria

PREPARATION

  1. For the sauce, heat 1/2 cup oil in a large heavy Dutch oven or kettle over low heat. Add the onions, minced garlic and pancetta, and cook, stirring, for 10 minutes, until the onions are wilted. Season liberally with salt and pepper. Raise heat slightly, add the wine and cook until it is mostly reduced, about 20 minutes. Crush the tomatoes into the pan, and add their juice. Add the tomato paste and 2 cups lukewarm water. Simmer for 1 hour.
  2. Combine the sirloin, cheese and eggs in a large bowl. Chop the parsley with the whole garlic until fine, then stir into the beef mixture. Season lavishly with salt and pepper. Using your hands, mix until all the ingredients are well blended. Shape into meatballs and set aside.
  3. Heat the remaining oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Dust the meatballs lightly with flour, shaking off excess, and lay into the hot oil. Brown the meatballs on all sides (do not cook through) and transfer to the sauce.
  4. In a clean skillet, brown the sausages over medium-high heat. Transfer to the sauce. Simmer 1 1/2 hours.
  5. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the ricotta, eggs, pecorino Romano, parsley and all but 1 cup of the mozzarella. Season well with salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly.
  6. Remove the meatballs and sausage from the sauce, and set aside to cool slightly, then chop coarsely. Spoon a thick layer of sauce into the bottom of a 9-by-12-inch lasagna pan. Cover with a layer of noodles. Spoon more sauce on top, then add a third of the meat and a third of the cheese mixture. Repeat for 2 more layers, using all the meat and cheese. Top with a layer of noodles, and cover with the remaining sauce. Sprinkle reserved mozzarella evenly over the top. Bake 30 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

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Today’s recipe: Haitian pork griot

Pork griot (pronounced gree-oh) is one of Haiti’s most loved dishes, and it’s easy to see why. Big chunks of pork shoulder are marinated in citrus and Scotch bonnet chiles, then simmered until very tender before being fried crisp and brown. This recipe departs from the traditional in that instead of frying the meat, it’s broiled.

Today's recipe: Haitian pork griot

The pork still gets charred edges and bronzed surface, but broiling is easier and less messy to do. However feel free to fry if the skillet calls out to you. And do make the traditional cabbage, carrot and chile pepper pickle called pikliz(pick-lees) for serving, which gives the rich meat just the right spicy-vinegar punch.


Ingredients

  • 1 small Scotch bonnet or habanero chile
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 small green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 small red bell pepper, diced
  • ¼ cup fresh chopped Italian parsley, more for serving
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt, more to taste
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme, plus more thyme leaves for serving
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup cane vinegar or cider vinegar
  •  Juice of 1 orange
  •  Juice of 1 lemon
  •  Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 3 pounds pork shoulder, not too lean, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (melted) or olive oil, more as needed
  •  Cooked rice, for serving

Preparation

  1. Quarter the chile and remove the seeds and membranes. Finely chop one quarter; leave the rest in whole pieces. Handle pieces carefully, preferably while wearing gloves; they are extremely hot.

  2. Transfer quartered and chopped chiles to a large Dutch oven or heavy pot with a lid. Add onion, bell peppers, parsley, salt, pepper, thyme and garlic. Stir in vinegar, orange juice, lemon juice, lime juice and Worcestershire sauce. Mix in pork. Cover pot and refrigerate overnight.

  3. The next day, remove from refrigerator at least 1 hour and no more than 3 hours before cooking. Heat oven to 325 degrees. Place pot over high heat and bring liquid to a simmer; cover and put pot in oven. Cook, stirring occasionally, until meat is very tender, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

  4. Using a slotted spoon, remove meat from pot, allowing all excess liquid to drip back into the pot and picking any bits of vegetables or herbs off the meat. Transfer meat to a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle meat with 2 tablespoons oil and salt to taste, and toss gently to coat.

  5. Strain braising liquid, discarding any solids. Return sauce to pot and simmer over high heat until reduced by about half, about 25 to 30 minutes.

  6. Meanwhile, heat the broiler. Broil meat, tossing occasionally, until meat is evenly browned, about 5 to 10 minutes. You want it nicely browned in spots but not so brown that it dries out.

  7. To serve, drizzle meat with additional oil and top with sauce, parsley and thyme leaves. Serve on a bed of rice with pikliz on the side.

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